The SaaS Podcast - SaaS, Startups, Growth Hacking & Entrepreneurship
Kyle Poyar is the of VP Marketing Strategy at OpenView, an expansion stage venture capital firm that helps build software companies into market leaders.

Your SaaS pricing strategy can make or break your business.

But getting your pricing right is really hard. And many companies struggle to understand what they're worth to their customers and how to clearly communicate that.

In this episode, we talk about 5 common pricing mistakes that SaaS companies make. And we provide recommendations to help you avoid making the same mistakes.

I hope you enjoy it.


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Direct download: 210_-_Kyle_Poyar.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:00pm PDT

Chris Ronzio is the founder and CEO of Trainual, a SaaS product that helps companies to onboard employees, automate training, systemize processes, and put everything about your business in one place.

Paid advertising doesn't work. That's what I often hear from founders of SaaS companies.

They tell me that they tried Facebook and Google ads, but it was too expensive to acquire customers and so they focused on other growth strategies like content marketing instead.

And when we hear things like that, it's easy to dismiss a growth channel and do what everyone else is doing. But sometimes, we find success by doing what everyone else is not doing.

Chris Ronzio was running a consulting business in Arizona. He realized that many of his clients were struggling with the same issue. So one day he hired a developer to build a simple tool for him. And he started using that tool to help his clients run their businesses better.

Some years later, Chris decided that he'd had enough of consulting. He really wanted to build a product business. And he realized that the simple in-house tool he'd been using with his clients all those years could actually be turned into a SaaS product.

He decided to go all in with this new business. And he quickly got to a few thousand dollars in monthly recurring revenue by selling his product to his consulting clients.

But finding more customers beyond his consulting clients wasn't so easy. He tried a bunch of things that either didn't work or had disappointing results. But he kept looking and trying different things and eventually he found a way to get customers - by using Facebook ads.

Initially, it was expensive to acquire customers using Facebook ads. But Chris kept at it and eventually he figured out how to get customers profitably. He knew how much a customer was worth and how much he could spend to acquire a new customer.

And once he had that working, he took a calculated risk. He started spending as much as he could on Facebook ads. At one point, he had over $300,000 worth of credit card debt. But it enabled him to grow the business much faster.

He went from zero to over $2 million in annual recurring revenue in less than 18 months.

In this interview we talk about the ups and downs that Chris experienced. We explore some of the mistakes he made and what he learned from those mistakes. And we dig into exactly what he did with this Facebook advertising campaigns to acquire those customers.

I hope you enjoy it.


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Need help building, launching and growing your SaaS business? Join SaaS Club Plus and get the insights, motivation and support you need to succeed. Learn more about SaaS Club Plus.

Direct download: SaaS_Growth_Marketing_-_Chris_Ronzio_209.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:00pm PDT

Max Kolysh is the co-founder of Zinc.io, an ecommerce lab that builds products to help Amazon and eBay sellers.

Every SaaS founder knows that finding product market fit is really tough.

You might have to pivot your SaaS business multiple times before you find the right product for the right market. So what can we learn from SaaS founders who failed repeatedly before they found success?

When Max and Doug were students at MIT, they talked about building a software product to help eBay sellers. And eventually, they both dropped out of college to start their business.

They got accepted into YC, but pretty soon realized that their idea wasn't that great after all. So they pivoted and built a product that saved people money when buying on Amazon.

They got some good traction and it looked like they were on their way to finding product market fit. But that all changed when they received a cease and desist letter from Amazon.

So they were back to square one again. They needed another idea.

One day they received an email out of the blue from an ex-customer who told them that he wanted to use an API but wasn't technical. He asked if they could help him out.

That email led to Max and Doug pivoting again and creating a new product. But this time it wasn't just an idea they'd come up themselves -- it was something a real customer needed.

And the product resonated with the market and helped them get traction.

Today, their company generates over $5 million in annual recurring revenue.

It's a great story about persistence, flexibility, listening to your customers and how to successfully pivot your SaaS business.

I hope you enjoy it.


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SaaS Club Plus


Need help building, launching and growing your SaaS business? Join SaaS Club Plus and get the insights, motivation and support you need to succeed. Learn more about SaaS Club Plus.

Direct download: 208_-_Successfully_Pivoting_a_SaaS_Business_-_Max_Kolysh.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:00pm PDT

Tyler Tringas is a General Partner at Earnest Capital which provides early stage funding for bootstrappers.

You want to start a SaaS company. People keep asking you how big the market opportunity is and if your idea will scale.

But maybe you don't want to build a huge business. Maybe you just want to create a sustainable and profitable business that gives you more freedom.

In 2011, Tyler quit his job to start a venture backed software startup called SolarList. He was a first time founder and non-technical. So he also started learning how to code.

Getting his startup to take-off was slow going, so he started doing some freelance work. Several of his clients wanted a way to add store locator functionality to their websites.

So on a 30-hour flight from San Francisco to Buenos Aires, Tyler built a store locator SaaS app as a side-project. When he landed, he deployed the code and launched the product.

He emailed some of this clients and within 24 hours he had a handful of people paying him $5 a month. The product was terrible and had a lot of missing functionality, but it did the basic job.

A year later, SolarList still wasn't getting traction and had be to shutdown. And Tyler was left with over $50,000 of credit card debt and uncertainty about his future.

He had to dig himself out of a financial hole. So he started doing more freelance work and putting more time into his StoreMapper side-project which was now doing around $1000 MRR.

By being able to spend more time on StoreMapper, Tyler was able to grow it over $5000 MRR in about 9 months. And eventually got it to over $40,000 MRR a few years later.

But he built it as a sustainable and profitable micro' SaaS company. It helped him to pay down his credit card debt, travel the world and spend more time on projects he found interesting.

And if building that type of business appeals to you, then you'll love this episode.

I hope you enjoy it.


Enjoy the show? Subscribe and leave a rating & review to show your support.


SaaS Club Plus


Need help building, launching and growing your SaaS business? Join SaaS Club Plus and get the insights, motivation and support you need to succeed. Learn more about SaaS Club Plus.

Direct download: Tyler_Tringas_Micro_SaaS_-_207.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:00pm PDT

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